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PostPosted: July 24 19, 2:06 pm 
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Been really busy lately, and I don't see it calming down for another month, but I had to take the time to share this article from today. There are many pointed statements throughout the article that I'll paste below:

Quote:
Climate change: Current heating 'unparalleled' in 2,000 years

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49086783

The research suggests that the current warming rate is higher than any observed previously. The scientists say it shows many of the arguments used by climate skeptics are no longer valid.

When scientists have surveyed the climactic history of our world over the past centuries a number of key eras have stood out. These ranged from the "Roman Warm Period", which ran from AD 250 to AD 400, and saw unusually warm weather across Europe, to the famed Little Ice Age, which saw temperatures drop for centuries from the 1300s.

The events were seen by some as evidence that the world has warmed and cooled many times over the centuries and that the warming seen in the world since the industrial revolution was part of that pattern and therefore nothing to be alarmed about. Three new research papers show that argument is on shaky ground.

The science teams reconstructed the climate conditions that existed over the past 2,000 years using 700 proxy records of temperature changes, including tree rings, corals and lake sediments. They determined that none of these climate events occurred on a global scale. The researchers say that, for example, the Little Ice Age was at its strongest in the Pacific Ocean in the 15th Century, while in Europe it was the 17th Century.

Generally, any longer-term peaks or troughs in temperature could be detected in no more than half the globe at any one time. The "Medieval Warm Period", which ran between AD 950 and AD 1250, only saw significant temperature rises across 40% of the Earth's surface. Today's warming, by contrast, impacts the vast majority of the world. "We find that the warmest period of the past two millennia occurred during the 20th Century for more than 98% of the globe," one of the papers states. What the researchers saw is that prior to the modern industrial era, the most significant influence on climate was volcanoes. They found no indication that variations in the Sun's radiation impacted mean global temperatures. The current period, say the authors, significantly exceeds natural variability.

Many experts say that this new work debunks many of the claims made by climate sceptics in recent decades. "This paper should finally stop climate change deniers claiming that the recent observed coherent global warming is part of a natural climate cycle," said Prof Mark Maslin, from University College London, UK, who wasn't part of the studies.


Here's the link to the abstract of the study, as well as a way to access the full study:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1401-2


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PostPosted: July 24 19, 2:20 pm 
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But...but...that one congressman brought that snowball onto the senate floor that one time!!! FAKE NEWS


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PostPosted: July 24 19, 2:29 pm 
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No [expletive], the free market fetishists will just talk about new business opportunities.


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PostPosted: July 25 19, 1:20 pm 
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The day after the warming study is released, this gets dropped in our collective laps:

Quote:
Megadroughts to plague the Southwest as climate warms, study says

Now, a study suggests that because of the drying influence of climate change, megadroughts could return to the region.

Megadroughts are defined more by their duration than their severity. They are extreme dry spells that can last for a decade or longer, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. They've parched the West, including present-day California, long before Europeans settled the region in the 1800s.

The study also suggests an increasing risk of future megadroughts in the American Southwest because of climate change.

Why is this? During the time of the medieval megadroughts, increased energy from the sun was, of course, caused by natural climate variability. But today, the world is experiencing increased dryness in many locations because of human-caused climate change, which is setting the stage for an increased possibility of megadroughts in the future through greater dryness, researchers say.

An expert not involved with the study praised the work: "What’s new here is they are really putting the pieces together in a way that hasn’t been done before,” Connie Woodhouse, a climate scientist at the University of Arizona, told National Geographic.

https://news.yahoo.com/megadroughts-pla ... 32054.html


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PostPosted: July 31 19, 3:23 pm 
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At least a 100 year+ record heat wave in Alaska
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PostPosted: August 1 19, 1:11 pm 
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mikechamp wrote:
The day after the warming study is released, this gets dropped in our collective laps:

Quote:
Megadroughts to plague the Southwest as climate warms, study says

Now, a study suggests that because of the drying influence of climate change, megadroughts could return to the region.

Megadroughts are defined more by their duration than their severity. They are extreme dry spells that can last for a decade or longer, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. They've parched the West, including present-day California, long before Europeans settled the region in the 1800s.

The study also suggests an increasing risk of future megadroughts in the American Southwest because of climate change.

Why is this? During the time of the medieval megadroughts, increased energy from the sun was, of course, caused by natural climate variability. But today, the world is experiencing increased dryness in many locations because of human-caused climate change, which is setting the stage for an increased possibility of megadroughts in the future through greater dryness, researchers say.

An expert not involved with the study praised the work: "What’s new here is they are really putting the pieces together in a way that hasn’t been done before,” Connie Woodhouse, a climate scientist at the University of Arizona, told National Geographic.

https://news.yahoo.com/megadroughts-pla ... 32054.html


I'm beginning to think that the Southwest is going to dry out faster than we can build that massive canal to drain Lake Michigan into the Colorado River basin.


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PostPosted: August 1 19, 1:16 pm 
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pioneer98 wrote:
mikechamp wrote:
The day after the warming study is released, this gets dropped in our collective laps:

Quote:
Megadroughts to plague the Southwest as climate warms, study says

Now, a study suggests that because of the drying influence of climate change, megadroughts could return to the region.

Megadroughts are defined more by their duration than their severity. They are extreme dry spells that can last for a decade or longer, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. They've parched the West, including present-day California, long before Europeans settled the region in the 1800s.

The study also suggests an increasing risk of future megadroughts in the American Southwest because of climate change.

Why is this? During the time of the medieval megadroughts, increased energy from the sun was, of course, caused by natural climate variability. But today, the world is experiencing increased dryness in many locations because of human-caused climate change, which is setting the stage for an increased possibility of megadroughts in the future through greater dryness, researchers say.

An expert not involved with the study praised the work: "What’s new here is they are really putting the pieces together in a way that hasn’t been done before,” Connie Woodhouse, a climate scientist at the University of Arizona, told National Geographic.

https://news.yahoo.com/megadroughts-pla ... 32054.html


I'm beginning to think that the Southwest is going to dry out faster than we can build that massive canal to drain Lake Michigan into the Colorado River basin.

You know it’s being talked about in back rooms.


Or have i missed some news.


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PostPosted: August 1 19, 1:27 pm 
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lukethedrifter wrote:
pioneer98 wrote:
mikechamp wrote:
The day after the warming study is released, this gets dropped in our collective laps:

Quote:
Megadroughts to plague the Southwest as climate warms, study says

Now, a study suggests that because of the drying influence of climate change, megadroughts could return to the region.

Megadroughts are defined more by their duration than their severity. They are extreme dry spells that can last for a decade or longer, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. They've parched the West, including present-day California, long before Europeans settled the region in the 1800s.

The study also suggests an increasing risk of future megadroughts in the American Southwest because of climate change.

Why is this? During the time of the medieval megadroughts, increased energy from the sun was, of course, caused by natural climate variability. But today, the world is experiencing increased dryness in many locations because of human-caused climate change, which is setting the stage for an increased possibility of megadroughts in the future through greater dryness, researchers say.

An expert not involved with the study praised the work: "What’s new here is they are really putting the pieces together in a way that hasn’t been done before,” Connie Woodhouse, a climate scientist at the University of Arizona, told National Geographic.

https://news.yahoo.com/megadroughts-pla ... 32054.html


I'm beginning to think that the Southwest is going to dry out faster than we can build that massive canal to drain Lake Michigan into the Colorado River basin.

You know it’s being talked about in back rooms.


Or have i missed some news.


There was an article last year warning of this possibility that someone posted to this board:

The Great Siphoning: Drought-stricken Areas Eye the Great Lakes


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PostPosted: August 1 19, 1:30 pm 
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Quote:
To desert dwellers, an idea that makes intuitive sense is to pipe Lake Superior water to where it’s “needed.” Such a project would be staggeringly expensive but technically doable; besides, the Great Lakes surely wouldn’t miss, say, 50 billion gallons — would they?

The populace all around the Lakes is rock-solid against shipping any water anywhere, and advancing any diversion plan would set off political warfare.

Or perhaps one should say “renew hostilities.” This story isn’t new. In 2007, New Mexico’s then-Gov. Bill Richardson suggested a Great Lakes diversion when the Western drought was only six years old. Following bloodcurdling protest, fellow Democrat Jennifer Granholm, then Michigan’s governor, told Richardson to zip it. A year later the eight Lakes states, including Minnesota, adopted — and President George W. Bush signed — a compact banning diversions without concurrence of all signatories.

Plus, an international pact gives Canada (along with the federal government in D.C.) a veto over any transfer.

But because the ultimate power rests with Congress and the president, multistate compacts and international accords can be false security. What’s done can be undone, as evidenced by all the undoing from today’s Washington crowd. What’s more, some scholars say the compact could be vulnerable to legal challenge, especially if a national emergency were declared.

A political knockdown would pit the Midwest vs. Westerners accustomed to no-holds-barred combat for water (to the death in the Wild West) and who have tended, when all else failed, to get what they wanted by simply taking it (for example, the lands of indigenous tribes).


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PostPosted: August 1 19, 2:10 pm 
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https://www.amazon.com/Water-Knife-Paol ... 080417153X


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