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PostPosted: September 26 18, 12:21 pm 
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https://highline.huffingtonpost.com/art ... -is-wrong/

I don't even know where to put this article. I put it here because it is intertwined with so many political issues:
- Health insurance
- Health care - doctors
- Big Ag
- Discrimination/stigma
- Urban sprawl
- School

The article spends a lot of time talking about how damaging it is to people to be shamed or stigmatized for being overweight, and how this stigma perpetuates a cycle of being overweight.

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The problem is that in America, like everywhere else, our institutions of public health have become so obsessed with body weight that they have overlooked what is really killing us: our food supply. Diet is the leading cause of death in the United States, responsible for more than five times the fatalities of gun violence and car accidents combined. But it’s not how much we’re eating—Americans actually consume fewer calories now than we did in 2003. It’s what we’re eating.

For more than a decade now, researchers have found that the quality of our food affects disease risk independently of its effect on weight. Fructose, for example, appears to damage insulin sensitivity and liver function more than other sweeteners with the same number of calories. People who eat nuts four times a week have 12 percent lower diabetes incidence and a 13 percent lower mortality rate regardless of their weight. All of our biological systems for regulating energy, hunger and satiety get thrown off by eating foods that are high in sugar, low in fiber and injected with additives. And which now, shockingly, make up 60 percent of the calories we eat.
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The same scurvy-ish negligence shows up at every level of government. From marketing rules to antitrust regulations to international trade agreements, U.S. policy has created a food system that excels at producing flour, sugar and oil but struggles to deliver nutrients at anywhere near the same scale. The United States spends $1.5 billion on nutrition research every year compared to around $60 billion on drug research. Just 4 percent of agricultural subsidies go to fruits and vegetables. No wonder that the healthiest foods can cost up to eight times more, calorie for calorie, than the unhealthiest—or that the gap gets wider every year.

It’s the same with exercise. The cardiovascular risks of sedentary lifestyles, suburban sprawl and long commutes are well-documented. But rather than help mitigate these risks—and their disproportionate impact on the poor—our institutions have exacerbated them. Only 13 percent of American children walk or bike to school; once they arrive, less than a third of them will take part in a daily gym class. Among adults, the number of workers commuting more than 90 minutes each way grew by more than 15 percent from 2005 to 2016, a predictable outgrowth of America’s underinvestment in public transportation and over-investment in freeways, parking and strip malls. For 40 years, as politicians have told us to eat more vegetables and take the stairs instead of the elevator, they have presided over a country where daily exercise has become a luxury and eating well has become extortionate.


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PostPosted: September 26 18, 12:26 pm 
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one thing that annoys me to no end is how healthy food is more expensive. perhaps not the best example but i always buy 1 can of unsalted cashews and 1 can of unsalted almonds to get thru the week. these are always more expensive than the ones with all the salt and flavor dust attached to it. every time i'm in that aisle i'm just like wtf. produce is usually fair for me but sometimes things seem too expensive. i find apples, grapes and a few other "common" natural items seem to be over priced, imo.


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PostPosted: September 26 18, 1:06 pm 
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Jocephus wrote:
one thing that annoys me to no end is how healthy food is more expensive. perhaps not the best example but i always buy 1 can of unsalted cashews and 1 can of unsalted almonds to get thru the week. these are always more expensive than the ones with all the salt and flavor dust attached to it. every time i'm in that aisle i'm just like wtf. produce is usually fair for me but sometimes things seem too expensive. i find apples, grapes and a few other "common" natural items seem to be over priced, imo.


it's ridiculous....and I'm lucky/fortunate that I have never been on food stamps, but from what I'm told (here in tx at least, don't know if it's diff per state), is that things like fresh food/lunch meats/etc can't be bought with food stamps, but prepackaged type foods can be? the unhealthier options are what has to be bought with them?


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PostPosted: September 26 18, 1:27 pm 
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You can buy fresh fruit and vegetables with food stamps.

You can make a lot of food that tastes good for a lot of people with basic poultry, basic vegetables, rice, spices and oil’s. But you have to be willing to take the time To learn how to cook and put the effort in. All on a food stamp budget.

I’ve taken my fair share of mentally ill and poor families to grocery stores corner stores etc. and showed them how to properly buy food. they were previously buying four dollar boxes of cereal, 24 packs of Pepsi, and non-perishable bread items like pastries. Junk food being cheap is largely a myth. Can’t stretch a bag of chips very far Or a box of granola bars. The sad thing is is I don’t think any of them stuck with it. Because it’s easier to buy the junk food. it tastes good and the brain loves those synthetic awful carbs

Given the ubiquity of Internet access, It’s not difficult to learn basic tasks like cooking a meal. It’s at your fingertips

Things like food deserts definitely exist in some of the rougher metro areas but it’s not universal.


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PostPosted: September 27 18, 9:31 am 
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Jocephus wrote:
one thing that annoys me to no end is how healthy food is more expensive. perhaps not the best example but i always buy 1 can of unsalted cashews and 1 can of unsalted almonds to get thru the week. these are always more expensive than the ones with all the salt and flavor dust attached to it. every time i'm in that aisle i'm just like wtf. produce is usually fair for me but sometimes things seem too expensive. i find apples, grapes and a few other "common" natural items seem to be over priced, imo.


Gluten free food also...incredibly overpriced compared to standard grocery items.


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PostPosted: September 27 18, 10:23 am 
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MAGA wrote:
You can buy fresh fruit and vegetables with food stamps.

You can make a lot of food that tastes good for a lot of people with basic poultry, basic vegetables, rice, spices and oil’s. But you have to be willing to take the time To learn how to cook and put the effort in. All on a food stamp budget.

I’ve taken my fair share of mentally ill and poor families to grocery stores corner stores etc. and showed them how to properly buy food. they were previously buying four dollar boxes of cereal, 24 packs of Pepsi, and non-perishable bread items like pastries. Junk food being cheap is largely a myth. Can’t stretch a bag of chips very far Or a box of granola bars. The sad thing is is I don’t think any of them stuck with it. Because it’s easier to buy the junk food. it tastes good and the brain loves those synthetic awful carbs

Given the ubiquity of Internet access, It’s not difficult to learn basic tasks like cooking a meal. It’s at your fingertips

Things like food deserts definitely exist in some of the rougher metro areas but it’s not universal.



You are hinting at it with this post, but for many people a bigger obstacle to healthy eating is lack of time, not lack of money. Fast food is popular because it is cheap and requires no time to make. Cooking your own meal takes more time, and learning how to cook also takes time. People simply do not have time. And the days they do have time, they are often very tired and don't feel like making a meal. I have struggled with my weight and lack of time and/or feeling tired is definitely a big factor.

One option that I have had mixed success with is frozen dinners. They have gotten a lot better in recent years IMO. They are just as fast as fast food but, if you get the right ones, they can be quite a bit more healthy. I lost 20lbs earlier this year by eating these 3 or 4 times a week for dinner. Then I got away from it and put it all back on. Of course, there is also a stigma against eating frozen dinners. Like, you must be a lonely loser if you eat this way. There are other good ones out there, but these and these are pretty decent. I don't know if people can buy these with food stamps. At my store the first ones cost $3.49 and the second ones are $2.99.


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PostPosted: December 27 18, 12:22 pm 
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Why Are We Still So Fat?
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There is just one almost uniformly effective treatment, and it is woefully underused: only about 1 percent of the 24 million American adults who are eligible get the procedure.

That treatment is bariatric surgery, a drastic operation that turns the stomach into a tiny pouch and, in one version, also reroutes the intestines. Most who have it lose significant amounts of weight — but many of them remain overweight, or even obese.

Their health usually improves anyway. Many with diabetes no longer need insulin. Cholesterol and blood pressure levels tend to fall. Sleep apnea disappears. Backs, hips and knees stop aching.

There are not nearly enough surgeons or facilities to operate on all the obese people who might be helped by bariatric surgery, noted Randy Seeley, director of the nutrition research center at the University of Michigan.

And many patients and doctors persist in thinking — all evidence to the contrary — that if overweight people really set their minds to it, they could get thin and stay thin.

Scientists got an unsparing look at what they were up against 50 years ago, when a clinical researcher at Rockefeller University, Dr. Jules Hirsch, did some old-fashioned experiments. He recruited obese people to stay at the hospital and subsist on a 600-calorie a day liquid diet until they reached a normal weight.

The subjects lost 100 pounds on average, and they were thrilled. But as soon as they left the hospital, the pounds piled back on.

Quote:
Dr. Seeley remains optimistic that a drug will be found. He studies mice and rats, giving them bariatric surgery and trying to untangle the web of biochemical changes that follow.

“We think we have good clues,” he said, “but nothing is far enough along.”

For now, researchers wish people — including fat people themselves — would stop blaming the obese for their problem.

“This idea that people should eat less and exercise more — if only it were so simple,” Dr. Hall said.


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PostPosted: December 27 18, 12:49 pm 
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political?


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PostPosted: December 27 18, 1:05 pm 
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I got my medical marijuana card and my alcohol consumption has plummeted to almost nothing in the past 6 months. If you've noticed my activity in threads here about bourbon and other alcoholic snobbery, you'll know I liked to drink and that's a big change for me.

Anyway, I've been thinking about trying to cut out sugar and refined flower. I'm not going to be fanatical about it. I'll definitely still go out to eat with friends and drink socially but I some IBS-like digestive issues that have always been a low key annoyance but has just gotten worse and worse with age to the point that it's now getting to be debilitating in the mornings and I think I'd feel a lot better with less processed food and sugar in my life. I'm not joining the paleo cult, but I do think there's something to having a diet that matches up with hundreds of thousands of years of human evolution leading to healthier energy and digestion.


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PostPosted: December 27 18, 2:06 pm 
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Eating all day.

3 squares and snacks in between.

I remember reading a Rolling Stone (I think) interview with David Carradine. They asked him if he was able to stay slim through his martial arts exercises.

He responded that, though that might be part of the reason, he only ate twice a day.


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