The Space thread

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GeddyWrox
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Re: The Space thread

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A team of astronomers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the University of Pennsylvania, Flatiron Institute, and Queen’s University has spotted two shells in the Virgo Overdensity region and two shells in the Hercules Aquila Cloud region of the Milky Way. These structures were produced about 3 billion years ago, when a dwarf galaxy plunged into the Milky Way’s center and was ripped apart by the gravitational forces.

http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/milky ... 08968.html

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mikechamp
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Re: The Space thread

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In case you didn't hear the news that is making headlines around the world:
Water on the Moon could sustain a lunar base

Having dropped tantalising hints days ago about an "exciting new discovery about the Moon", the US space agency has revealed conclusive evidence of water on our only natural satellite. This "unambiguous detection of molecular water" will boost Nasa's hopes of establishing a lunar base. The aim is to sustain that base by tapping into the Moon's natural resources.

Speaking during a virtual teleconference, co-author Casey Honniball, postdoctoral fellow at Nasa's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland, said: "The amount of water is roughly equivalent to a 12-ounce bottle of water in a cubic metre of lunar soil."

The findings have been published as two papers in the journal Nature Astronomy.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-54666328

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thrill
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Re: The Space thread

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I find great comfort in all this space water we're finding pretty much everywhere we look. Humans can't be the lone standard bearer for self aware species. We suck too much.

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GeddyWrox
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Re: The Space thread

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Is it wrong of me that my first reaction was "Great, so now we get to strip-mine another astronomical object." ?

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mikechamp
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Re: The Space thread

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GeddyWrox wrote:
October 27 20, 8:36 am
Is it wrong of me that my first reaction was "Great, so now we get to strip-mine another astronomical object." ?
Yeah, I thought the same thing. I mean, what are we going to do once we use up all the water on the moon? It's not like it rains up there to replenish the very meager supply.

And I know they are anticipating discovering more than 12 ounces, but how are they going to make enough rocket fuel, out of a few 2 liters of embedded water, to get anywhere farther than the moon's atmosphere?

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mikechamp
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Re: The Space thread

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Want to become the wealthiest person the world has ever seen? Just wrangle this enormous and distant celestial body into your possession:
Hubble Examines Asteroid That’s Worth More Than the Global Economy

The Hubble Space Telescope has captured a new, clear picture of the 16 Psyche asteroid — one of the most valuable asteroids we know to be in existence, Forbes reported. Some estimates place the value of the asteroid at $10,000 quadrillion. To put that in perspective, the global economy was worth about $142 trillion in 2019.

What makes the asteroid so valuable? Well, for starters, it’s huge — it’s about 140 miles wide. And it appears to be made out of pure metal, which is very rare for an asteroid. “We’ve seen meteorites that are mostly metal, but Psyche could be unique in that it might be an asteroid that is totally made of iron and nickel,” Dr. Tracy Becker, a planetary scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas, told Forbes.

Psyche is located about 230 million miles from Earth and is one of the most massive objects in the solar system’s main asteroid belt, which orbits between Mars and Jupiter.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/hubble-exami ... 58108.html

AWvsCBsteeeerike3
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Re: The Space thread

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Let's buy a bunch of rare earth magnets, a fishing pole, a space suit with some O2, and make a space elevator then go fishing. With a good enough rod, I think technically a cast would go on forever since there is no air resistance or gravity. I guess there's some friction in the reel though...hmmm....scratch that. Get a bow and arrow with a lot of rope not wound on anything. Shoot it at the massive rock, attach to it with the magnets then like slowly pull it in and drop it in the ocean. Easy peasy.

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mikechamp
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Re: The Space thread

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Planetary aficionados... rejoice!
You can see every planet in our solar system this week

It might be time to break out that telescope.

This week, there will be some not so familiar sights in the sky: Seven planets will be visible at various points in the day. Venus and Mercury are bright enough to see in the mornings, while Mars, Jupiter, Neptune and Saturn will be easier to see at night.

Earth Sky published a guide to viewing all of these planets, along with Uranus, on its website.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/11/13/us/plane ... index.html

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mikechamp
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Re: The Space thread

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The picture that accompanies this article is incredible:
Huge Puerto Rico radio telescope to close in blow to science

The National Science Foundation announced Thursday that it will close the huge telescope at the renowned Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico in a blow to scientists worldwide who depend on it to search for planets, asteroids and extraterrestrial life.

The independent, federally funded agency said it’s too dangerous to keep operating the single dish radio telescope -- one of the world’s largest -- given the significant damage it recently sustained. An auxiliary cable broke in August and tore a 100-foot hole in the reflector dish and damaged the dome above it. Then on Nov. 6, one of the telescope’s main steel cables snapped, causing further damage and leading officials to warn that the entire structure could collapse. NSF officials noted that even if crews were to repair all the damage, engineers found that the structure would still be unstable in the long term.

The telescope was built in the 1960s with money from the Defense Department amid a push to develop anti-ballistic missile defenses. In its 57 years of operation, it endured hurricanes, endless humidity and a recent string of strong earthquakes. The telescope boasts a 1,000-foot-wide (305-meter-wide) dish featured in the Jodie Foster film “Contact” and the James Bond movie “GoldenEye.” Scientists worldwide have used the dish along with the 900-ton platform hanging 450 feet above it to track asteroids on a path to Earth, conduct research that led to a Nobel Prize and determine if a planet is potentially habitable.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/huge-puerto- ... 40284.html
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GeddyWrox
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Re: The Space thread

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Ugh. That sucks!

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